Now it’s caterpillar outbreaks caused by global warming

Now it’s caterpillar outbreaks caused by global warming“. Anthony Watts is annoyed by an article in The Independent titled “Caterpillar plague on Isle of Wight was caused by climate change, says expert“. Here’s the offensive passage:

In general, these insects are getting worse in this country because the climate is changing and the summers are getting warmer.

Outrageous! Hopefully Anthony’s readers will flood the article comments with truth.

One thought on “Now it’s caterpillar outbreaks caused by global warming

  1. Beth Hale (Daily Mail Online) fills in the missing pieces. She explains Steve Gardner’s expertise: he’s an exterminator. And she gives the explanation (the usual one) for the global warming attribution: The moths have been moving northward.

    “Steve Gardner, of Island Pest Control, is the man charged with the task of removing the caterpillars, although it is not a task he relishes. Two years ago he ended up in casualty with a severe skin reaction after tackling an infestation…”

    “The caterpillars have long been causing problems on the southeast coast. But in recent years, thanks to Britain’s increasingly warm weather, they have begun moving north.”

    “Hants Moths” has a distribution map for the Brown-tail moth (Euproctis chrysorrhoea), moving northward from Britain’s southeast Coast.

    “Formerly confined to a few coastal localities, notably Hayling Island, this species has recently and suddenly greatly increased its range. Larval nests are now plentiful in winter along the coast…and it is extending its range inland.”

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